Courses

Comp 095 and Comp 099

Writing Techniques

Designed to help the less-prepared student qualify for Comp 105.  Includes a review of basic grammar and syntax and frequent practice in writing short papers to develop skills in unified and coherent writing.  Comp 095 is especially designed for non-native speakers of English.  These courses do not provide credit toward graduation or toward the 6-hour composition requirement.

Comp 105

Writing & Rhetoric I

Focuses on the study and practice of writing and rhetoric, with special emphasis on the writing process.  Students write and read critically a range of texts, and consider academic and nonacademic genres and conventions.

Comp 106

Writing & Rhetoric II

Focuses on the study of writing and rhetoric through composing a range of researched texts.  Students study the rhetorical choices effective for writing in different media, and learn practical strategies for academic inquiry and for giving useful feedback in response to the writing of others.  Such strategies include those related to the use of electronic and print resources, peer-review and revision.

Comp 110 and Comp 220

Honors Writing & Rhetoric I & II

Students in the Honors Program satisfy their composition requirement with these courses, taught in conjunction with the Honors Seminars.

Comp 223

Creative Writing

An introduction to writing poetry, short stories, and drama, emphasizing analysis and discussion.

Comp 227

Intermediate Exposition and Argumentation

Further explorations in exposition and argumentation to develop the ability to write essays and articles. Intensive practice in writing and careful examinations of appropriate books and shorter prose works.

Comp 270

Technical Writing for Engineers

Instruction and practice in designing technical reports. Students study the rhetorical problems facing the professional engineer in industry and learn practical strategies for analyzing technical information and communicating it to both technical and non-technical audiences.  Topics include audience analysis, technical research methods, report formats  (written and oral, formal and informal), argumentation and persuasion, editing. This course fulfills the Composition II requirement for engineering majors, who must achieve second semester sophomore standing before taking the course.

Comp 280

Business Writing & Rhetoric

COMP 280 focuses on instruction and practice in composing and designing business documents, including abstracts, memos, email, letters, reports, resumes, proposals, and slide presentations. Students study the rhetorical problems facing business professionals and learn practical strategies for analyzing business information and communicating with professional and non-professional audiences. Such strategies include those related to the use of electronic resources, peer-review and revision. This course fulfills the Composition II requirement for business majors.

Comp 327

Advanced Exposition

Composition 327/English 327 builds on introductory composition courses by offering further study and practice in college-level writing proficiency. As an advanced course in the writing of expository, narrative, and analytical essays, Comp/Eng 327 helps students build  rhetorical and audience awareness, find their own authentic voices as writers, and focus on elements of style.  Sections of the course typically ask students to read a variety of written texts (including but not limited to full-length works of non-fiction, shorter published essays, and imaginative texts from a variety of genres) and use expository writing as a means to critically engage with those texts. Like other UM - Dearborn writing courses, Comp/Eng 327 emphasizes revision as a crucial strategy for discovering purpose, clarifying meaning, and making the written word as forceful and effective as possible.

Comp 364

Writing for Civic Literacy

In this course students study how politicians, the media, and critical citizens use language to inform, advance agendas, and promote social issues and they will learn genres of writing that help them become more active citizens. The class will perform community service, collaborating with classmates and community agencies to create real-world writing projects.

Comp 390

Topics in Composition

An examination of problems and issues in selected areas of rhetoric and composition.  The title as listed in the Schedule of Classes will change according to content.  The course may be repeated for credit when the specific topic differs.

Comp 399

Independent Study

A significant writing project in non-fiction or fiction prose developed in accordance with the needs and interest of those enrolled and agreed upon by the instructor.  Participants may also study texts of published authors.  May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Comp 464

Contemporary Rhetorical Theory

In this course students will examine a range of contemporary rhetorical theories through study of representative practitioners and related developments in composition & rhetoric, linguistics, philosophy, communications and psychology.   Students may not receive credit for both COMP 464 and COMP 564.

Comp 468

Reading/Writing Young Adult Fiction

In this course students explore the young adult novel arom a reader's and a writer's point-of-view.  Students read young adult fiction to explore such issues as gender, race and identity, as these relate to young adult lives and American culture generally.  Students write several short stories or chapters of a novel directed toward a young adult audience.

Comp 485

Theories of Writing

In this course students learn why and how people write for particular audiences and investigate how writing "works" in a variety of contexts. Subjects will include cognitive and social theories of writing and the writing process, theories of persuasion, writing across the curriculum, writing for multiple audiences, writing in the workplace, writing for self-fulfillment, and teaching writing.

Comp 564

Contemporary Rhetorical Theory

An examination of contemporary rhetorical theories through study of representative practitioners and related developments in composition & rhetoric, linguistics, philosophy, communications and psychology.   Additional work will distinguish this course from its undergraduate version.  Students may not receive credit for both COMP 464 and COMP 564.

 

Comp 590

Topics in Composition

An examination of problems and issues in selected areas of Composition.  Titles listed in the Schedule of Classes will change according to content.  The course may be repeated for credit when the specific topic differs.  Only offered for graduate credit.